Harford Manor School

Harford Manor School

Pupil Premium Funding

 

Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium is additional funding given to schools so that they can support their disadvantaged pupils and close the attainment gap between them and their peers.

2018/19 allocation to Harford Manor School is £29,070

This money is being used to support our children that are Looked After (in Foster Care) and children from low income families.

Over the year the money will:

  1. Support the individual goals in the Personal Education Plans (PEPs) of our Looked After Children
  2. Fund the post of specialist HLTA (0.6 FTE) to improve Literacy and Core Skills for individuals and small groups
  3. To keep the cost of after-school clubs low, to make provision affordable for all
  4. To continue to enable the running of “Talk Tools” across school, to improve Oral Motor skills.

 

2017/18 allocation to Harford Manor School is £29,605

This money is being used to support our children that are Looked After (in Foster Care) and children from low income families.

Over the year the money will:

1. Fund the post of the specialist HLTA (three days per week) to improve Literacy and Core skills for individuals and small groups

2. To keep costs low in provision of after school clubs, to enable this to be reasonably priced and accessible to all families

3. To support the Personal Education Plans (PEPs) of our Looked After Children

4. To enable development and management of the Oral Motor Therapy “Talk Tools” across the school

 

2016/17 allocation to Harford Manor School is £27,445

This money is being used:

1. To continue to fund a specialist HLTA (for three days) to work on Literacy and Core skills development with specific students and small groups, across all age ranges

2. To contribute towards after school club provision to enable costs to be low and affordable for all parents and carers

3. To increase provision and bespoke tailoring of programmes to work on oral motor placement therapt via “Talk Tools” approach, for an increasing number of students

 

2015/16 allocation to Harford Manor School is £22,165

This money will be used as follows:

1. To continue to fund a specialist HLTA (for three days) to work on Literacy and Core skills development with specific students and small groups, across all age ranges

2. To contribute towards after school club provision to enable costs to be low and affordable for all parents and carers

3. To continue to provide paid places at a local SEN youth club, to enable our students to develop friendship groups and improve communication and social opportunities

4. To train more staff in the use of Talk Tools (Oral Placement Therapy) to increase specific communication intervention strategies across the school 

 

Impact: Students at Harford manor made very good progress over 2015/16 and the use of the Pupil Premium money enabled all children and young people to achieve equally well.  Excellent reading and phonic development work via the HLTA project has been achieved.  A significant number of children now have bespoke communication interventions via “Talk Tools” now that we have qualified staff to monitor and deliver this work.

 

2014/15 allocation to Harford Manor School was £20,320

This money was used in the following ways:

1. To continue to fund a specialist HLTA to work on Literacy and Core skills development with specific students across all age ranges

2. To partly fund the after school club provision to enable costs to be low and affordable for all parents and carers

3. To continue to provide paid places at a local SEN youth club, to enable our students to develop friendship groups and improve communication and social opportunities

Using both CASPA data and comparisons against the DfE National Progression Guidance, our fantastic students achieved significantly beyond expectations over the academic year 2014/15. Overall outcomes show that no pupils achieved below expected levels, with 79% making above expected progress! These outstanding outcomes are also reflected when tracking specific groups of students, e.g. Pupil Premium students and children that are ‘Looked After,’ show the same excellent rates of progress.

 

2013/14 allocation was £19,275

This money was used in two ways:

1. The co-creation of a locally based specialist Youth club, with two other Complex Needs Schools as partners.  Designed to increase evening social activities, in a specially staffed and resourced local base, for students with complex needs between the ages of 14 and 19.

2. The appointment of a specialist HLTA to work both with and beyond the remit of the school's Speech and Language Team.  Designed to support individual children and small groups of children with communication and literacy development.

 

The attainment and achievement of our students for the academic year (2013/14) was exceptional! 

We are delighted and proud of the excellent progress made.  We are particularly pleased that all groups of children achieved equally as well.  There was no difference in the excellent results of children from different ethnicities, those that had previously underachieved, children eligible for the Pupil Premium or children that are Looked After.  Well done to all of our students!

 

2012/13 allocation was £14,400 and was used to support the ENCARE resilience factors that are considered to protect a child against risk environments http://www.encare.info/en-GB/riskyenvironments/resilience/factors/

We believed that these key points (above) reflected a great need for a large portion of the school population and therefore focussed the spending of the Pupil Premium 2012 on enhancing PSHE opportunities, developing and resourcing lunchtime clubs and resources, leisure and peer sharing equipment.  Pupil outcomes showed that students for whom the Pupil Premium was allocated achieved equally as well as other students (above National norms for students with similar learning profiles - National Progression Guidance data and CASPA data).

2011/12 allocation was £10,248 and was used to support After school provision. In terms of outcomes for both cohorts of children on Free School Meals and those that are Looked After, the data is very similar for both groups:

Attendance was good, progress in both Maths and English against the National Progression guidance shows achievement at the Upper quartile (highest level) and IEP progress was also good.